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Honda BR V Facelift Review & Overview

Honda BR V

Honda BR V Overview

It won’t be an exaggeration to state that Honda brought a sense of premiumness in the mid-size sedan market in India. The Japanese car maker has always had a clear focus of not being the herd type and mass inject the market with unnecessary products instead take time and understand the segment before venturing into it.

This approach was tagged as being ‘too conventional’ for mainstream but then the brand earned dividends with the launch of new generation products. In fact, the acceptability of the brand increased substantially helping them achieve a growth 185% from 2012 to 2017. Incidentally, India also happens to be Honda’s fourth largest market and thus the efforts to make sure the products as well as production capacities meet the growing demands of the market are totally justified.Check for car loan interest calculator.

Making sure the momentum is maintained, Honda will enter into a new segment with its most talked about crossover – the BR-V, in 2018. Though the company insists on calling it a crossover, in real world condition, it will stand against other compact SUVs as well. Should you wait till the next year for this? We find out in our preview drive.

Honda BR V Look

The Honda BR-V looks good, but there are too many things that make it look too similar to the Mobilio MUV. This is not the case with any of the other cars based on the Brio platform – the Amaze and the Mobilio have their own identities. The BR-V on the other hand, at first glance at least, looks like a Mobilio which has been given a facelift and given some new accessories. That said, the BR-V has a handsome face with the sleek headlamps, a re-imagined Honda signature wing-like chrome grille, aggressive front bumper with a silver faux skid-plate and clam-shell bonnet. The side profile with the black lower-cladding, large 16-inch aggressive looking 5-spoke alloy wheels, large doors, stretched windows with a generously large rear quarter-glass, and the roof-rails is well proportioned. The chrome handles and the chrome strips at the bottom of the doors look quite nice for a change.

Many other companies can learn a thing or two from the BR-V in this matter. Move to the rear and you get to see the other important sector where designers from the company spent a lot of time. The new tail-lamps which stretch from side-to-side (the centre part consists of reflectors only, though) makes the BR-V look wider.However, the BR-V is not an SUV, and is at best a crossover. It does sit higher than the Mobilio though, with a ground clearance of more than 210mm the BR-V is at par with the Renault Duster AWD.

Honda BR V Comfort

Familiar. Familiar, because the interior is similar to the refreshed Amaze and has some bits from the Jazz and the City. And, that only makes it good, as the all-black theme is inviting. But look closer and the quality of plastic and fit and isn’t class leading. In fact, it is a step down compared to the Creta. It isn’t as well equipped either. So, there’s no touch-screen or reversing camera. It does however get automatic climate control, a three-pod instrument cluster with a built-in trim computer, leather, height-adjustable driver’s seat and aircon vents for second row of passengers.

It also has a lot of space, especially for knee and head room. And, of course, it is the only car in its class with three rows of seating. The seats all round aren’t just well-cushioned and supportive, these recline as well. And the second row can slide fore and aft giving more flexibility to occupants to be able to utilise the space in the best way possible. Furthermore, it is easy to access the third row too. The middle seat with 60:40 split function tumbles down quickly creating easy access. And once in the third row, it feels decently airy too.

Honda BR V Gearbox

Honda will offer the BR-V in two engine trims of petrol and diesel. The diesel will be the 1.5-litre motor that is also seen in the Honda Jazz and the Honda City. Similarly, it will produce 98 bhp of power and 200 Nm of torque. It will come with a six-speed manual transmission. The diesel typically will serve well for the highway mongers but then for the city commuters, it will be the petrol doing rounds.We got a chance to test drive the Honda BR-V under a controlled environment at a specified speed on a special track. The duration was too less for us to form definite judgements about the riding dynamics and the overall performance but based on our brief experience with the car, we concluded the following. Check for Honda BR V in Iiit-bh

Firstly, the 1.5-litre iVTEC engine will power the petrol variants and will come with a six-speed manual transmission. In addition, Honda will also offer the same engine with a seven-speed CVT transmission. This 1497cc motor makes 118 bhp of power at 6000 rpm and generates an impressive 145Nm of torque at 4600 rpm. The power delivery has been deliberately tuned in such a way to order more push in the lower range.

Honda also claims to have made the engine smoother than before and has been tweaked according to the body type. Even the efficiency has been increased by usage of low friction rings along with piston stroke noise reduction. Also, tackling criticism against this transmission, Honda has developed a new CVT unit for small sized engines. This has helped in reducing the lag by quicker acceleration from standstill as well as reduced overall weight of the unit increasing the mileage.

The BR-V petrol mated to the CVT is best used as a city runabout. One needs to be light footed for best results in terms of efficiency and comfort. There is absolutely no use going pedal to the metal as the only result is a rise in noise. The paddle shifts help shift to a higher ‘gear’ faster and reduce the noise, but that’s it. The petrol i-VTEC motor mated to the CVT has an ARAI-certified mileage of 16kmpl. Honda has missed an opportunity here by not offering an automatic diesel variant of the BR-V, the combination of a diesel-automatic SUV has gained a lot of popularity across price points. For the manual transmission, the throws are short and slick. Honda has been known to make cars that are effortless to drive.

The diesel on the other hand is more frugal. However, if your commute does not involve travelling a lot in the city, it is best to stick to the motor as initial cost, maintenance would be lesser.

Honda BR V Riding

The drive quality of Honda BR-V is enhanced with electric power steering, and easy accessibility to control lever of acceleration, clutch and brake, assuring stress-free long drives. The strong build quality, tough suspension and the superior quality of interiors offer great comfort to the occupants.. The ride is sorted too. It is firm but is absorbent at speed and doesn’t thud too much over poor roads either. And it manages unseen speed bumps and undulations well too. Straight-line stability again is commendable and the BR-V feels confident and completely home handling the fast sweeping corners too. To top it all, the brakes have good bite and progression and there’s ABS in this top of the line VX version for added reassurance. Book Honda BR V Test Drive.

Honda BR V Safety

The Honda BR-V is a great handler. Especially the petrol engine. Ride is not too supple and not too stiff and the steering offers right amount of feedback. Throw the BR-V petrol into a corner and you would come out at the other end gracefully. However, this car is in no way meant to do lap times. On the safety front, the BR-V gets ABS and dual front airbags as standard across all variants. This is a good move considering the car priced slightly higher.

Honda BR V Price in Pune

Honda Brv On-Road Price in Pune ranges from 5,55,006 to 16,44,139 for variants BRV E Petrol and BRV VX Diesel respectively. Honda Brv is available in 8 variants and 6 colours. Below are details of Honda Brv variants price in Pune. Check for Honda BRV price in Pune at Autozhop.

Honda BR V Bottomline

Honda is a little late to the compact SUV party. But, the BR-V has its USPs, its pluses, which should have buyers consider it. Three rows of seating for one. Then you have efficient engines, utility, dynamics and a premium badge to sweeten the deal. However, do note, the BR-V cannot off-road, it doesn’t pack in as many features or exude the same aura of premiumness as the Creta. The decider now will be its pricing. If priced under the Duster and the Creta, and by a noticeable margin, the Honda BR-V is certainly worth it.

Author Since: Aug 04, 2018

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